Jun 11
The New York Times has an interesting tale of mass produced, factory built housing.
 
I was always fascinated by modular building.  It kind of combines manufacturing, which was my career prior to rentals, with housing which has been my life’s calling, and robotics, which is the future.
 
Years ago we proposed an infill housing project using modular construction.  The process was too politicized for outsiders to succeed, but it would have been cool to do, and beneficial for the community.
 
Jun 08

Many years ago I used a voice to email app, Jott.  Then six or seven years ago I wrote that Jott shut down, but I found a replacement that I liked, Reqall.  That too met a similar fate. I tried another, Dial2Do.  I didn’t like it that much, but better than nothing.  It too ended a year later.  So I relinquished myself to using Siri to send myself emails.  A bit cumbersome, but I guess…

This past week I tried Drafts 5.o.  It has a lot of features that none of the previous ones had.  It is great at long form dictation – say a draft of a letter while you commute.  Much easier than the last time I tried Dragon dictate, but its been a while and Dragon may be great too.  You can send the text to a bunch of different apps and storage platforms.

Price is free, which most of us can still afford even with summer maintenance season upon us.

Oh, and it works on an  Apple Watch, which I don’t own.  But think how cool you would look doing your Dick Tracy impersonation while entering some job on your watch….

 

May 27

The Milwaukee Journal is reporting that a provision in ACT 317 may stop attorneys from representing pro bono eviction clients.

The small change included in Act 317 “has a potential chilling effect” on lawyers volunteering at clinics like the Eviction Defense Project, said Dawn Caldart, director of pro bono and professional development at Quarles & Brady, a Milwaukee-based national law firm.

This article, like many others on evictions vilifies owners.

We need to get the other side of the story out there
 
… the one with frivolous legal defenses whose only goal is delay
… the one where tenants that strive to meet their obligations are the ones that ultimately are paying for those who tenants that do not
… the one where twenty million dollars a year of rent is not paid in Milwaukee county alone
… the one where mom and pop, moderate income owners are struggling to pay their own bills because the rent isn’t paid
… the one where elderly duplex owners are refusing to rent the other unit due to problems with prior tenants
…the one where no owner benefits when tenants fail and must be evicted.
 
May 22
A lot of PhDs say the same thing we’ve said for years about landlording in general and Section 8 in particular in peer reviewed papers.  Typically we only see those critical of owners, but there are many that accurately explain the dynamics of rental housing.
Here is a excerpt from two.
 
How to attract more landlords to the housing choice voucher program: a case study of landlord outreach efforts –  David P. Varady , Joseph Jaroscak b and Reinout Kleinhans
Our interviews suggest that existing stereotypes of Section 8 (HCVP) landlords as greedy and unconcerned about their tenants are inaccurate. Moreover, our findings provide new support for the classic studies of inner-city landlords cited earlier. Currently, many landlords in the HCVP are themselves experiencing significant financial burdens and risks as they try to deal with the low-income rental market. Tenants exhibiting various forms of problematic behavior, such as drug dealing, substance abuse, and violent crime, exacerbate the problem.
Urban Landlords and the Housing Choice Voucher Program – Prepared for U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development by The Poverty and Inequality Research Lab Johns Hopkins University Philip Garboden Eva Rosen Meredith Greif Stefanie DeLuca Kathryn Edin
Of small properties with affordable rents (below the regional median), only those without debt service are viable. Only 25 percent of mortgaged properties have positive cash flow (Garboden and Newman, 2012). Taken together, these quantitative analyses and our own findings described in the following suggest that much of the stock is financially precarious, which could theoretically lead to under maintenance, abandonment, and conversion.
June 11th, 2018: The publication is back up on HUD USER at a new address above
Note: this publication has been removed from HUD USER.  I reached out to the authors who said it will be reposted soon, that the removal was to improve the formatting
Apr 23

Heartbreaking Photos Of Eviction Day In America

Matt Desmond’s NYT best seller “Evicted” is impacting our industry in ways that even he probably never predicted.

In speaking to him, my company had a small mention in the book as well as Desmond and I were on an NPR broadcast on evictions, I do not feel he is anti landlord, nor that he puts the blame solely on our industry. Rather his objective appears to be universal housing vouchers, kind of Rent Assist on steroids.

Let’s face it, evictions are economically hard on rental property owners as well. Anything that would address the root cause would be good for owners and tenants alike.

But many “advocates” are reading the title of the book, and probably not much more than that, combining it with the eviction statistics Desmond has assembled and are using this as a rallying cry to end all evictions, blaming landlords in the process. They fail to realize or admit that tenants that do not pay rent or are causing problems are increasing the costs to those tenants who are paying as they should.


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